Vientiane temples

After visiting the arc, we walked back to our hotel and passed a bunch of temples. They are totally different from anything we saw in Japan and South Korea. The Laotian people seem to be especially fond of gold. In contrast to the temples in Japan and Korea, where every part of the temple has high quality details, the temples in Laos looked very beautiful from a distance, but up close it looked like it was rushed and painted by a three year old that can’t color between the lines yet.

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First we had to risk our lives again by crossing the road during a non stop tsunami of motorcycles and taxis.
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The guard at the entrance of a pavilion next to the What That Foon temple.
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The pavilion itself.
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On both sides of the altar in the pavilion where sitting monks that looked very real. Only after we figured out they were sitting in an glass box without any holes to breath, we concluded they must be fake. Unfortunately there were only explanations in gibberish.
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The actual temple.

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Another temple called Phat Tich. Some people were looking at us like, "what the hell are you doing here, get lost". We felt unwanted and quickly left after take a few snapshots outside.
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:p
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Back at the guesthouse. What a magnificent view of the construction site next door 🙂
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In the touristy part of Vientiane we had dinner. Of course we had to try spring rolls in south east Asia. And we have to say, they were among the best we ever had.
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On our way back from dinner we tried to find the night market. But we didn't really find it (or maybe we did but in that case it was soo insignificant and loaded with rubish that we didn't bother to have a look). We walked back along the Mekong river and could see Tailand at the other side. A statue of Chao Anouvong, the last king in 1805, was the only nothworty thing to see on our way back. He led the rebellion against the Thai monarch Rama III. After losing, recapturing and losing the capital again, Rama III ordered the destruction of Vientiane with the exception of one important buddist temple and put Chau in an iron cage in Bangkok until he died at age 61.
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