A rainy day in Jeju

After spending several weeks in big cities like Kyoto, Osaka and Seoul, we though it would be a good time to go to a place with a bit more nature and peace. So, we booked two tickets to Jeju, a big island belonging to South Korea 100 km south of the mainland. The island is about 70 km long and 40 km wide, and although there are running buses all over the island, we decided to rent a cheap car to be able to go wherever we want quickly. Arriving at the airport, we where looking for the non existing (at least on the airport) car company Sixt. Apparently we needed a transfer to their location, which was arranged quickly after Sanne asked around a bit and we got directed to theire free shuttle bus service. We got a nice automatic Kia K5. The good thing in South Korea is that they drive, like we do, on the right sight. The bad thing was that the view from the car was terrible due to tinted glass, small windows, darkness outside and bad rainy wheater. Besides the difficulties to see anything on the outside, navigation with the korean GPS was impossible and the traffic in Jeju city was – unfortunately not really as we anticipated – incredibly busy. After reminding myself ten times or so to break with my left feet, we finally got out of the crazy traffic jams in the centre, and I could relax a bit. In the end we arrived safely at our Airbnb where we stayed with a lovely couple in one of theire rooms in theire little apartment.
Later we found out, the traffic rules in South Korea are sometimes a little bit different from rules we use. It appeared that they do not have the concept of keeping right or left as far as possible. They just go wherever they like. Do you want to takeover? Just zigzag between the traffic like in a computer game. Furthermore, a red traffic light does not have the same meaning to a Korean as as to people from western countries. If you want to go right at an intersection it is perfectly normal to just drive through red. Careful as I was, I initially stopped for the red light everytime. Silly me. I think I annoyed quite a lot of Koreans with this recless behaviour.
Next day it was still raining cats and dogs, almost nonstop, so we decided to visit a lava cave and one of the many museums.


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The Manjanggul lave tube cave is close to 9 km long and belongs to the top ten of biggest known lava tube caves.

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The first and only time we needed the jackets we brought from home.

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Jeju people call this turtle rock, because it looks like a turtle, or so they say. It also looks like the shape of Jeju island.

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The biggest know lava turd in the world. More scientiffically it is called lava column. It's 7.6 meter high and formed because of lava dripping from a hole in the ceiling.

After visiting the cave we went to the “Fossil and kite” museum. In Jeju they make a habit of combining two completely different subjects into a single museum. These include for example the “Pony and crocodile” museum and the “Sex and health” museum.

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Touch me... hold me...
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Mark of a dino or so they say.
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Closeup of a huge coral fossil.
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Ex piece of wood
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I really like this archeoptrix fossil very much
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Crocodile fossil
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Dino shit
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The kite part of the museum showed all the different designs commonly used over the world.
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A cute Chinese kite.
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Gangnam style korean kite.
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Hang glider kites in a deep stall.
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In the evening it finally stopped raining and we went for a quick stroll over the beach. Sanne couldn't be happier.
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Breath again.

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